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Thursday, August 13, 2015

Summer Garden: Picking Produce, Keeping it Pretty

Here are the garden crops I picked this morning from our produce patch. 
 We've been eating fresh tomatoes for about two weeks now.
 The Roma plum tomatoes get rinsed, bagged and put in the freezer.  They are easy to use in the winter for soups or stews by just dipping them in hot water, slipping off the skins, and plopping them in the pot. 
Between all the comings and goings, we are trying to keep the yard looking fresh.  Yesterday we actually had some measurable rain, about 2/10 of an inch in our weather station rain gauge.  We missed it because we had to go south for some family business for most of the day. 
We have kept our watering system going so far, but even that doesn't keep up with the heat and the drought. 




Because there is moisture in our soil, and no other neighbors are watering, the moles have found us.  They tunnel just under the surface looking for food, and then at night the raccoons come and dig up the surface tunnels to see what they can find.  So parts of the lawn are a mess, and it requires a lot of stomping before Tom can mow it. 



 Beets and carrots are under a row cover cloche to keep out leaf miner and carrot worms. 
 The zucchini patch is a jungle.  I have 12 loaves of zucchini bread in the freezer and now with the newest picking we are once again overwhelmed with zucchini. 
 The sweet peas are shutting down but the marigolds, cosmos, zinnias and dahlias are still going strong. 
 In this new bed seedlings of golden fever few fill in gaps and the rest is just holding until we start cutting it all back. 
When we get to stay home, we walk first thing in the morning and then spend a few hours working in the yard.  After our 1:00 lunch hour, we take it easier, reading, checking online communication, keeping the cat company.

It's the lazy, hazy daze of summer. 

15 comments:

  1. My two zucchini plants are powerhouses too. Maybe I should do some baking. I could always freeze a couple and then ship them across the country to my kid. I have similar problems with my lawn too. The raccoons dig for grubs every night.

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  2. I check in occasionally just to see if you have pictures of things that are "green." I'm in the middle of Droughtland in CA. We've even named our acre The Sahara. So seeing green is wonderful, and your previous post made me happy too because it showed water. Ah lovely water. Thank you for reminding me the colors of green and blue still exist.

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  3. What a weird year it's been so far. And I wonder how long this will continue. We didn't get a drop up here and it's been nonstop sun. I'm getting really tired of it! I hear we might get some rain tomorrow, but the promised 2-5 inches has evaporated to maybe a tenth of an inch. Sigh. :-(

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  4. Between drought and vermin your grass has had a terrible time.

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  5. Such pretty vegetables. I need to make a row cover cloche like yours for the next kale I plant.

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  6. We have not tasted a good tomato this year. Makes me hungry to think about those Roma's in a pot of winter soup. It's seldom I say anything about needing rain but we do. That seems odd to me.

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  7. I am in awe of your beautiful garden. Your veggies are a real delight harvesting for the freezer is wonderful you will be able to savour the taste of summer throughout the winter months.

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  8. Lovely tomatoes. Those are really red.

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  9. Gorgeous vegetables. I am eating summer squash and zucchini nearly every day and I don't even have a vegetable garden. For some reason I have been off tomatoes lately. Funny how taste can change.

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  10. Your veggies look wonderful. There is no comparison between home grown and store bought.
    Mercy and I thought I had a mole/vole problem with a terrier dog to do the digging. Frustrating isn't it?

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  11. Your gardens still look good. I bet some Seniors would like your extra zucchini. I used to take extra tomatoes and cukes to a Senior Living Apartment building, they loved it because they don't have gardens:)

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  12. Sumptuous gardens, as always! Thank you for the hydrangea-growing info. I have printed it to refer to often!

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  13. Darned moles! Your garden is looking great despite the heat and drought. Such a bountiful harvest, especially the zucchini!

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  14. I'm sorry about the mess those critters are making of your lawn. Also, it is terrible to read of the effects of the drought you are having. It seems unreal to us when we are having rain, rain, rain.

    Your produce looks so wonderful. Nothing is better than fresh tomatoes from the garden. I miss those days. Enjoy!

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  15. Time here to plant fall crops and tear up most of the summer crops. Your yard it too lovely to be real.

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