Greetings from Seattle



Monday, June 12, 2017

Elk Rock Garden of the Bishop's Close



Hidden away on a bluff overlooking the Willamette River is this estate garden, designed by John C. Olmsted and created in the 1920s, for the original owner, Peter Kerr. When Kerr died in 1957 at the age of ninety-five, he had spent sixty years developing his garden. In 1959 Kerr's daughters donated the house and land to the Episcopal Diocese of Portland with the stipulation that the garden be open to the public. 

We were here on Tuesday of our Memorial Day extended weekend. Bright and sunny the previous day, Tuesday dawned wet and chilly. With one umbrella we found stashed in the car, and my rain jacket I packed just in case, we set out to explore this Eden. 

This is a long walk around this 23 acre garden. I won't say much. Just come along at your own pace. 

















 A peak out onto the great lawn.As you can see, there are magnificent trees here. 






 On a clear day I understand there are views of Mt Hood here, but not today.






 Down at the end of the great lawn now. 




 Exploring an island in the lawn. 













 Can you find little me in here with these big trees?

 From here, at the end of our walk, we can see the hillside where we began. 


If you ever get a chance, visit this garden. It is out of the way, but so worth the trip. 

14 comments:

  1. I've heard about this garden from Portland bloggers, but I've never been. Next time, maybe. It does look like it's worth it, so peaceful. And all those mossy boulders and tree limbs! Thanks for sharing your photos.

    ReplyDelete
  2. If I lived near there I would spend a lot of time in that lovely garden; thanks for taking us on the tour. What a generous gift from the daughters, is the house a residence for the bishop? Or used by the church?

    ReplyDelete
  3. love the walk in the coolness, where's my umbrella?

    ReplyDelete
  4. It looks like there were very few people visiting so you could take your time and enjoy the garden. There's certainly a wide variety.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Imagine spending all those years perfecting the garden. It's such a peaceful looking place. Too bad the weather didn't cooperate.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great tour of this fabulous garden. I've heard of it before but never visited.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thank you for taking us along and sharing this beautiful garden. What a beautiful place to visit!

    ReplyDelete
  8. It is very beautiful indeed, even in the mist. I enjoyed my trip with you. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Oh my goodness. Absolutely stunning. Perhaps too well tended to be called primeval, but I understand the lack of words. I can only imagine the awe one must feel being there in person.

    ReplyDelete
  10. It has been very hot in the Midwest for June and this visit felt like a delightful respite.

    ReplyDelete
  11. What a beautiful place to walk. Those sisters were quite special to donate this property instead of fighting over the dollars it could have brought.

    ReplyDelete
  12. This is amazing! It was hard, but I did find tiny you in the picture. I've never seen such trees. Twenty three acres is a lot of garden to walk through. I will surely never go there so I enjoyed your pictures.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Wow those Foxgloves were beautiful! :)

    ReplyDelete

I would love to read your comments. Since I link most posts to Facebook, you may comment there if you do not have an account. I have eliminated Anonymous comments due to spammers.