Greetings from Seattle



Friday, January 19, 2018

More garden photos

It's dark and chilly and drippy today, a good day to be inside. I was able to do my stretching exercises this morning after going to our usual Friday morning breakfast and then stopping by the eyeglass center to have my glasses straightened after their little fling yesterday. This afternoon I tentatively mounted the stationary bike in the garage to see how that would feel, and was pleased to be able to do the whole ten mile session. I think that will be my rehab exercise until I can get back to walking. I am better with each day. 


Here are more photo I took yesterday of our mid-January garden. 

Down the path to the garden deck, a large Douglas fir and an old Western Red Cedar frame the side yard. 
 Hydrangeas are yet to be clipped of old blooms. 
 Camellias and rhododendrons anchor the space with year round green, as does the variegated fetid iris. 
 It looks like we may be losing one of our recently planted arborvitae hedge trees. They were replacements for the fir hedge we finally took out several years ago. 

 Native oxalis bubbles up out of the ground almost as soon as the old plants die back. 
 Following the path up to the front yard. 
 Evergreen heucheras fill the porch planter box. 
 In front of the living room window the witch hazel is opening its fringy blooms. 




 A fancy fatsia adds winter interest on the front property line. After we removed the 15 foot high hedge, we exposed the little wood lot on the neighbor's property in front of us and added plants for color and texture. 

 Near the witch hazel, a large clump of sarcococca is in bloom, sending out its intense and wonderful fragrance from its tiny blooms.  

 Pots on the porch are still stuffed with clippings from the garden. 
 Tom's collection of hardy cyclamen includes both spring and winter flowering varieties. The foliage is as lovely as the little blooms. 

 Snow drops are up and ready to pop open. 
 Our resident hummingbirds come to the winter jasmine right outside the family room window. 
 Abelia Kaleidoscope was planted just two years ago where we removed an overgrown box wood. The non-hardy echeverias have not yet succumbed to the cold and the wet. They are usually melted by now. 
 Non- native mahonia. I wish it would bloom, as it is a winter blooming variety that hummingbirds love. 
 There's just a touch of gold along the driveway. 
 And from the inside we can see most of these little early bloomers in our winter garden. 

Another weekend is upon us. Have  good one, everyone!

15 comments:

  1. I love the windows in your house. We are house bound as Bob’s blood platelets are critically low. I don’t have much more freedom than he does because it’s critical I not take the flu and give it to him. We’re using masks and sanitizers hoping to keep the germs away.

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  2. the hardy early stuff is well on the way. Good on you to do 10 miles on the bike. That's a lot of time.

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  3. I always enjoy seeing your lovely yard!!

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  4. how fun to be surrounded by green-ness.

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  5. Fun to see the Cyclamen and the Snowdrops...you will be real colorful before long:)

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  6. Your yard is so lovely the whole year around! Do you get hummingbirds this time of the year? Here in Missouri we have them in the spring and summer but they leave in October as it gets too cold for them here.

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  7. Oops! I wrote my comment about your cyclamen in the previous comment. You really do have the most incredible garden, Linda and Tom! Having seen it with my own eyes I can attest to its amazingness!

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    1. These are hardy cyclamen, not the same as the hot house variety found in nurseries and florist shops.

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  8. Such a beautiful place, Linda. I love your winter garden so much. And the snowdrops are up and getting reading to bloom! Yay! :-)

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  9. Being out of commission, I had to go back to your last post to see what happened. Yikes. I do remember that ghastly picture of your poor face from that last fall. Glad this one is not as colorful but know it will take a little bit to get back up to snuff. Heal well and slowly. There is no rush. You have some marvelous views to enjoy as you heal.

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  10. I absolutely love your garden. I know it takes a lot of work but it's pretty clear you and your DH enjoy it.

    Hope you are feeling better soon.

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  11. It rained in Tucson yesterday for several hours. Only our third day of rain in 11 weeks. I love it.

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  12. Great to hear that your recovery is going well. Your garden is looking gorgeous as always and I'm really surprised to see that your echeverias haven't melted.

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