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Sunday, December 9, 2018

Fatigmand and Lefse

I don't know if I will actually be passing on the tradition of making these Scandinavian treats, but the kids and I had a good time Saturday making them.

Isaac is all about frying the fatigmand cookies in the hot oil.



I am the official roller outer. The dough is very elastic and it takes a lot of work to get it paper thin.
Then I cut the dough into strips, then pieces.
Irene cuts a slit into each one, and then slips the tails through to make the knots.



You can see the freshly ground cardamom in them as they wait for the fryer. 

After the cookies are cooled, they get a powdered sugar drench.

Sampling began immediately.

There was a break in the action before we got going on the lefse. Tom got everything set up while I made the dough. That consists of getting out the chilled mashed potatoes I made the night before, which were mashed with plenty of butter and whole milk. Into that I mixed in enough flour to make a consistency like bread dough. 

Flour flies as the rolling out process must be well floured to keep the dough from sticking as it is rolled paper thin. 

 Tom stuck around long enough to show Irene how to lift the thin sheet of dough and get it onto the hot griddle. She was a fast learner. You must use the "special stick". 



 While we finished up, Tom made a pizza run. 

This guy never got off the couch after our break. He said he would help with the cutting into wedges and the buttering and sprinkling with cinnamon sugar and rolling later. 
He did, but we only prepared two sheets of lefse that way, and the rest are stored in the refrigerator.

Isaac helped with the eating. 

13 comments:

  1. Making special foods at this time of the year is a family affair. So is eating them.

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  2. What a neat tradition. They may not carry it on, but they will always remember it.

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  3. Linda, you have two wonderful young adult grandchildren. I love seeing you make those fancy treats The process is nothing short of amazing.

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  4. I wonder if my grands would be every interested in some cooking project. I have been more successful with one at a time, unfortunately.

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  5. what a fun activity with the grandkids. Irene looks like her mom.

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  6. What delightful memories you are creating for/with your Grands.

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  7. When I was teaching, somebody always brought Lefse. It's great that you involve the grandchildren with this project.

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  8. They do look tasty, but that sure is a lot of work! I am always taken aback by pictures of the two of them, growing up so fast, Linda. They are young adults now. :-)

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  9. I think it is wonderful that you are passing on the making of these traditional pastries to your grands. Someday they will have grands to teach.

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  10. Such good help both in their own element:)

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  11. Taste testing is an important part of baking.

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  12. It's good to see Isaac and Irene again. They are so grown up now. You and Tom are such good grandparents!!

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  13. You've got quite an impressive crew there. It's heartwarming to see you passing on these traditional food-making techniques. So, no lutefisk? :)

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